squirella (squirella) wrote,
squirella
squirella

MUTINUS

Его зовут мутинус. Скорее всего Mutinus ravenelli, но, возможно и, Mutinus caninus. Все они - stinkhorns (рога-вонючки). Названы в честь римского божества плодородия, аналога древнегреческого Приапа. Двое его близких родственников называются по-простому: Phallus impudicus и Phallus duplicatus. Не гриб - а мечта фрейдиста! Зато найдено имя для нового компьютера.


Stinkhorns frequently bewilder people by popping up in lawns, thrusting their slime-covered tips into the world within a matter of hours. They have been much maligned over the years; for an amusing list of adjectives applied to stinkhorns by mushroom authors through the years, see Arora (1986, 764-68). Unlike most other mushrooms, the stinkhorn distributes its spores by applying an odorous, spore-thick slime to its tip, which flies and other insects are attracted to. The flies then carry the spores to other places.

Several stinkhorns are common in North America, including the aptly named Phallus impudicus and the netted stinkhorn, Phallus duplicatus. Among the stinkhorns, Mutinus elegans and Mutinus caninus are fairly unique in their appearance: they look like pinkish to orangish spikes which arise from whitish "eggs" in the ground, and they are initially covered with brown or olive brown slime (before being ravaged by flies). I have heard Mutinus species compared to a feature in canine anatomy--though I, of course, would not be so tactless as to mention the similarity. The description below combines Mutinus elegans and Mutinus caninus, which stinkhorn specialists (there really are such people) consider to be separate species.
Michael Kuo



В России, как выяснилось занесен в Красную (sic!) Книгу.
Tags: pad, боги, гриб
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